Difference between revisions of "Carl Lindner"

From RAGEPATH Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "<ul> <li><b>1990: Carl Lindner hired robocallers to rig a public opinion survey about Donald Trump held by USA Today.</b> “What a spokeswoman for Carl H. Lindner Jr. had to...")
 
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
<ul>
 
<ul>
<li><b>1990: Carl Lindner hired robocallers to rig a public opinion survey about Donald Trump held by USA Today.</b> “What a spokeswoman for Carl H. Lindner Jr. had to say (in a statement) about Great American Insurance Co.'s heavy participation in <i>USA TODAY</i>'s Donald Trump hot line: ‘Some of the employees of Great American Insurance, including Mr. Lindner, feel strongly that irrespective of one's own feelings toward an individual's lifestyle, Trump is one example of the entrepreneurial spirit that has been one of the major freedoms in this country and has been responsible for building businesses and creating jobs. We disapprove of an attitude that we think is harmful of that entrepreneurial spirit and disapprove when the media and other parties continue to discredit unnecessarily the people that are visible leaders of this country. We feel that the intent of this survey seemed to have been to have a good laugh at someone's misfortune.’” (<i>USA Today</i>, July 19, 1990)
+
<li><b>1990: Carl Lindner hired robocallers to rig a public opinion survey about Donald Trump held by USA Today.</b> “A Cincinnati financier, Carl H. Lindner, organized a phone blitz that skewed the results of a call-in telephone poll on Donald Trump conducted for <i>USA Today</i>, the newspaper said today. The newspaper said an independent analysis of the call-in results to a ‘Trump hot line’ from June 8 through June 10 showed that 5,640 of 7,802 calls came from two phone numbers at Great American Insurance Company, a subsidiary of Mr. Lindner's American Financial Corporation. [...] The newspaper said it studied phone records generated by Airdata Inc., a call-in service company, because of some apparent last-minute electronic-ballot-box stuffing. From 5 P.M. to 6 P.M. E.D.T. on June 10, the final hour of the three-day call-in, more than 1,000 calls poured in, of which 93 percent were pro-Trump. Callers were asked to say which statement they agreed with: ‘Donald Trump symbolizes what makes the U.S.A. a great country,’ or ‘Donald Trump symbolizes the things that are wrong with this country.’” (<i>New York Times</i>, July 20, 1990)
 +
<li><b>Lindner's company issued a statement claiming they were motivated to cheat at the survey about Trump because of a general distaste for sentiments underlying anti-Trump opinion.</b> “What a spokeswoman for Carl H. Lindner Jr. had to say (in a statement) about Great American Insurance Co.'s heavy participation in <i>USA TODAY</i>'s Donald Trump hot line: ‘Some of the employees of Great American Insurance, including Mr. Lindner, feel strongly that irrespective of one's own feelings toward an individual's lifestyle, Trump is one example of the entrepreneurial spirit that has been one of the major freedoms in this country and has been responsible for building businesses and creating jobs. We disapprove of an attitude that we think is harmful of that entrepreneurial spirit and disapprove when the media and other parties continue to discredit unnecessarily the people that are visible leaders of this country. We feel that the intent of this survey seemed to have been to have a good laugh at someone's misfortune.’” (<i>USA Today</i>, July 19, 1990)
 
</ul>
 
</ul>

Latest revision as of 15:55, 8 November 2019

  • 1990: Carl Lindner hired robocallers to rig a public opinion survey about Donald Trump held by USA Today. “A Cincinnati financier, Carl H. Lindner, organized a phone blitz that skewed the results of a call-in telephone poll on Donald Trump conducted for USA Today, the newspaper said today. The newspaper said an independent analysis of the call-in results to a ‘Trump hot line’ from June 8 through June 10 showed that 5,640 of 7,802 calls came from two phone numbers at Great American Insurance Company, a subsidiary of Mr. Lindner's American Financial Corporation. [...] The newspaper said it studied phone records generated by Airdata Inc., a call-in service company, because of some apparent last-minute electronic-ballot-box stuffing. From 5 P.M. to 6 P.M. E.D.T. on June 10, the final hour of the three-day call-in, more than 1,000 calls poured in, of which 93 percent were pro-Trump. Callers were asked to say which statement they agreed with: ‘Donald Trump symbolizes what makes the U.S.A. a great country,’ or ‘Donald Trump symbolizes the things that are wrong with this country.’” (New York Times, July 20, 1990)
  • Lindner's company issued a statement claiming they were motivated to cheat at the survey about Trump because of a general distaste for sentiments underlying anti-Trump opinion. “What a spokeswoman for Carl H. Lindner Jr. had to say (in a statement) about Great American Insurance Co.'s heavy participation in USA TODAY's Donald Trump hot line: ‘Some of the employees of Great American Insurance, including Mr. Lindner, feel strongly that irrespective of one's own feelings toward an individual's lifestyle, Trump is one example of the entrepreneurial spirit that has been one of the major freedoms in this country and has been responsible for building businesses and creating jobs. We disapprove of an attitude that we think is harmful of that entrepreneurial spirit and disapprove when the media and other parties continue to discredit unnecessarily the people that are visible leaders of this country. We feel that the intent of this survey seemed to have been to have a good laugh at someone's misfortune.’” (USA Today, July 19, 1990)